Cell phone law

September 20, 2014 at 7:45 pm • Posted in ALL POSTS1 Comment

Several years ago, the state of Washington passed a law that driving while talking or texting on a cell phone was a moving infraction. This was supposed to reduce the problem of people being distracted while driving and causing accidents. The net result was that the number accidents actually increased. The public responded by trying to hide their phone while talking and put themselves at a greater risk for causing an accident.
The smart solution would have been to determine what was really causing these accidents. Drivers talk to other passengers in their vehicle without any appreciable increase risks. I have seen many drivers with a cell phone in their hand and their driving is just as good as the person who has no phone. Many drivers drive one handed, including myself, without being a risk to themselves or others. The problem was never talking on the phone, it was dialing the phone or texting a message. That is the real distraction.
Even in the Washington State driver’s manual, it is suggested that a driver check his or her gauges about half a dozen times per minute to determine that the vehicle has no pending problems and the driver is not exceeding the speed the posted limit. If officials had suggested that drivers were to use the same procedure for texting and dialing, there would be significantly fewer problems. The ideal way to dial a cell phone while driving is to do it ONE number at a time AFTER looking around to see that no other car is near you for each number dialed or each letter one enters in their text message. Dialing a complete number or a complete word diverts one’s vision from the road way too long. Glancing back at traffic virtually elimin ates the hazard.
Government officials seem to feel passing laws is the only solution to problems. Benjamin Franklin once summed it up like this: Those who sacrifice liberty for safety, deserve neither.
I’m sure that people who fought for our liberties during the Revolutiony War are rolling over in their graves at the way the public submits to some of the current restrictions in our lives.